[OT] organizing/grouping transistors

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[OT] organizing/grouping transistors

Bob Blick-5
To save space, storage for the majority of my home stash of small signal transistors is a plastic tub. Inside are about 50 or 60 ziploc bags, each with 20 to 1000 transistors, one part number per bag, and a big label with part number and a few specs. Saving space this way wastes a lot of time each time I need to find a transistor, half the time I don't even know what I have. I am thinking about using one or two of those many-drawer things to organize them.

OK, how do I group the drawers? By part number seems wrong. By package is probably a good start. Then by type(BJT, JFET, MOSFET), maybe. Grouping complementary types together seems sensible. What next? Usage(RF, switching, linear)? Voltage?

Anyone been through this before and have a system that makes sense? This is just for my corner of the hobby sphere.

Thanks, Bob
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RE: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

Steve Smith
I keep as many of mine on reels as possible and 7" reels are the exact size
for DVD racks repurposed and mounted horizontally they clip in same for all
my small parts

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email] <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Bob
Blick
Sent: 01 July 2020 06:35
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public. <[hidden email]>
Subject: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

To save space, storage for the majority of my home stash of small signal
transistors is a plastic tub. Inside are about 50 or 60 ziploc bags, each
with 20 to 1000 transistors, one part number per bag, and a big label with
part number and a few specs. Saving space this way wastes a lot of time each
time I need to find a transistor, half the time I don't even know what I
have. I am thinking about using one or two of those many-drawer things to
organize them.

OK, how do I group the drawers? By part number seems wrong. By package is
probably a good start. Then by type(BJT, JFET, MOSFET), maybe. Grouping
complementary types together seems sensible. What next? Usage(RF, switching,
linear)? Voltage?

Anyone been through this before and have a system that makes sense? This is
just for my corner of the hobby sphere.

Thanks, Bob
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Re: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

Richard
In reply to this post by Bob Blick-5


On 7/1/2020 1:34 AM, Bob Blick wrote:
> To save space, storage for the majority of my home stash of small signal transistors is a plastic tub. Inside are about 50 or 60 ziploc bags, each with 20 to 1000 transistors, one part number per bag, and a big label with part number and a few specs. Saving space this way wastes a lot of time each time I need to find a transistor, half the time I don't even know what I have. I am thinking about using one or two of those many-drawer things to organize them.
>
> OK, how do I group the drawers? By part number seems wrong. By package is probably a good start. Then by type(BJT, JFET, MOSFET), maybe. Grouping complementary types together seems sensible. What next? Usage(RF, switching, linear)? Voltage?
>
> Anyone been through this before and have a system that makes sense? This is just for my corner of the hobby sphere.
>
> Thanks, Bob

I use the multi-drawer parts cabinets with each cabinet labelled with a
letter and each drawer labelled with a 3-digit number. For example. A101
- A160 in one 60-drawer bin. Then, all parts are listed in a
spreadsheet/database containing quantity, part number, supplier part
number, supplier name, cost, etc.
This way, I don't have to go to the effort of shifting drawers when I
add to new part numbers to inventory, and it is easy to look up a part
by whatever characteristic you want.

Richard


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Re: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

sergio
In reply to this post by Bob Blick-5
I would recommend that you label each container (be it plastic tub or
draw) and keep track of what is in each draw on computer. You can than
organise, re-organise your inventory as you see fit. This will allow you
group by different criteria and quickly select parts that work well
with others.

This could be as simple as using a text file and search with grep, a
spreadsheet or a more elaborate database using something like mysql or
sqlite. Also with a little thought your simple text file can quickly
and easily be imported to a spreadsheet or database.

Regards
Sergio Masci

On Wed, 1 Jul 2020, Bob Blick wrote:

> To save space, storage for the majority of my home stash of small signal transistors is a plastic tub. Inside are about 50 or 60 ziploc bags, each with 20 to 1000 transistors, one part number per bag, and a big label with part number and a few specs. Saving space this way wastes a lot of time each time I need to find a transistor, half the time I don't even know what I have. I am thinking about using one or two of those many-drawer things to organize them.
>
> OK, how do I group the drawers? By part number seems wrong. By package is probably a good start. Then by type(BJT, JFET, MOSFET), maybe. Grouping complementary types together seems sensible. What next? Usage(RF, switching, linear)? Voltage?
>
> Anyone been through this before and have a system that makes sense? This is just for my corner of the hobby sphere.
>
> Thanks, Bob
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Re: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

Clint Jay
In reply to this post by Bob Blick-5
Depends how many types and what uses, I buy specific parts for specific
purposes and others for general purpose use so my jellybean parts, 2N3904,
'2222, BC548, TIP41/42, BD139/140, BC639/640, BS150  etc. live in adjoining
compartments in drawers with their complements (BC639/640 are favourites of
mine)

Outside of that I tend to organise by function, family, complement, etc.

RF Power (Not many of these, they tend to be expensive)
RF Low Power, sub divided into Bipolar/MOSFET
Darlington and complements
High Current. (Again, bipolar, MOSFET, Package)
SMD...

Life is too short to be continually sorting and 'filing' but I don't keep a
huge selection of parts, maybe 30-40 types so I can lay hands on them
easily.

Labelling drawers clearly is far more important for me, it's kinda
frustrating to know you've got 100 BC548 somewhere but can't find them.

On Wed, 1 Jul 2020 at 06:36, Bob Blick <[hidden email]> wrote:

> To save space, storage for the majority of my home stash of small signal
> transistors is a plastic tub. Inside are about 50 or 60 ziploc bags, each
> with 20 to 1000 transistors, one part number per bag, and a big label with
> part number and a few specs. Saving space this way wastes a lot of time
> each time I need to find a transistor, half the time I don't even know what
> I have. I am thinking about using one or two of those many-drawer things to
> organize them.
>
> OK, how do I group the drawers? By part number seems wrong. By package is
> probably a good start. Then by type(BJT, JFET, MOSFET), maybe. Grouping
> complementary types together seems sensible. What next? Usage(RF,
> switching, linear)? Voltage?
>
> Anyone been through this before and have a system that makes sense? This
> is just for my corner of the hobby sphere.
>
> Thanks, Bob
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> http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
> View/change your membership options at
> http://mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
>


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Re: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

Peter-251
In reply to this post by Richard

On 1/07/2020 5:09 pm, Richard wrote:

>
> I use the multi-drawer parts cabinets with each cabinet labelled with a
> letter and each drawer labelled with a 3-digit number. For example. A101
> - A160 in one 60-drawer bin. Then, all parts are listed in a
> spreadsheet/database containing quantity, part number, supplier part
> number, supplier name, cost, etc.
> This way, I don't have to go to the effort of shifting drawers when I
> add to new part numbers to inventory, and it is easy to look up a part
> by whatever characteristic you want.
>
> Richard
>
Hi everyone,

I use the method that Richard describes. This type of system has worked
in many storage and inventory, I have been in charge of for many
different large and small companies, and my own use. Far better than
sifting/sorting through bags/envelopes with mixed (although properly
labelled bags with part numbers etc.) parts in them. I have worked in
many places, and seen many lack of a sorting/organising parts, and I can
say the speadsheet/database and A001 - A160 etc. style labelling works
well and is very efficient. The places I have worked that did not have
such a system, was extremely time wasting looking for parts in
bags/boxes etc.. Of course reels of components were a bit different, but
still organised in a similar way though.

Note1: This system ONLY works if it is used correctly. If people
misplace parts, they will become lost.

Note2: Keep a clipboard near the parts and write down what you use, then
this way you can keep track of stock levels on the speadsheet, but still
be more accurate, as sometimes, the computer is not at the ready.

Peter.

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Re: [OT] organizing/grouping transistors

Harold Hallikainen-3
The somewhat random placement of parts with a database to keep track of
where everything is is interesting. I understand that is what Amazon uses
in their warehouses. Stuff is stored wherever it will fit. The computer
system sends the picker to the right place for each product. This also, of
course, is how stuff is stored on disk drives using FAT. Stuff is staved
where it will fit and the file allocation table keeps track of where stuff
is and where space is available.

Harold

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